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digATLThe Digital Atlanta Portal

Projects, collections, and data about the metro area produced by Georgia State University faculty, staff, and students working with and within their communities. More ...

Tag: Architecture

ATLMaps

The ATLMaps platform, a collaboration between Georgia State University and Emory University, combines archival maps, geospatial data visualization, and user contributed multimedia location pinpoints to promote investigation into any number of issues about Atlanta. While currently focused on one city to demonstrate the power of stacking thousands of layers of information on one place, this […]

The ATLMaps platform, a collaboration between Georgia State University and Emory University, combines archival maps, geospatial data visualization, and user contributed multimedia location pinpoints to promote investigation into any number of issues about Atlanta. While currently focused on one city to demonstrate the power of stacking thousands of layers of information on one place, this innovative online platform allows users to layer an increasing number of interdisciplinary data to address the complex issues that any city poses. The project looks to offer a framework that incorporates storytelling reliant on geospatial data and for normalizing input across a range of data sets about so that material can be cross-compared in novel ways, allowing users to make connections between seemingly unrelated data sources and ask questions that would not be apparent when only looking at one particular project. The ATLMaps project will also encourage knowledgeable members of the university and local communities to curate data on the site to demonstrate the possibilities for synthesizing material across projects and data types.

Complete list of ATLMaps contributors and past and present team members at https://atlmaps.org/about

Creator
Brennan Collins, Assoc. Director, GSU Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning for Digital Pedagogy and Atlanta Studies; Megan Slemons, GIS Librarian, Emory Center for Digital Scholarship; Jay Varner, Lead Software Engineer, Emory Center for Digital Scholarship; Tim Hawthorne, Assist. Professor of Geographic Information Systems, Dept. of Sociology, University of Central Florida; Joe Hurley: Ph.D. candidate, School of History and Sociology, Georgia Tech; Ben Miller, Senior Lecturer, Technical Writing & Digital Humanities, Emory University

Krog Codex: Archive of Krog Street Tunnel

A Community Interactive Digital Archive. Krog Street Tunnel is one of Atlanta’s premier destinations for street art, political communication, and a community bulletin board. Since the late 1960s, artists have added and subtracted new paintings, messages, and designs to its walls, effectively creating a rapidly changing archive of local cultural concerns. The tunnel and the […]

A Community Interactive Digital Archive. Krog Street Tunnel is one of Atlanta’s premier destinations for street art, political communication, and a community bulletin board. Since the late 1960s, artists have added and subtracted new paintings, messages, and designs to its walls, effectively creating a rapidly changing archive of local cultural concerns. The tunnel and the walls connected to it on DeKalb Avenue and Wylie Street comprise a single living dynamic work of art that is a cultural center of Cabbagetown. As such, to understand the cultural composition of the town, it is important to not only examine the art but also the creatives who give the tunnel life. Given the ephemeral nature of the tunnel art and its historical significance to the city, Georgia State University’s EPIC program, an academic research initiative dedicated to providing students with the opportunities to work on public-facing projects, has assembled a team of professors, graduate students, and undergraduates to document and catalog Krog Street tunnel’s art. In addition to regularly scanning and archiving the community’s tunnel art and murals, we also plan to conduct interviews with artists, patrons, and members of the community. This collection will become the basis of a frequently updated online publicly accessible 3d digital archive. Launched in 2022.

Creator
Georgia State University EPIC program students and faculty
Category
Arts & Culture

Unpacking Manuel’s Tavern

Aims to both preserve this unintentional archive as it was before Manuel’s Tavern underwent renovations in 2015 and provide a platform through which one might learn more about the individual items in this archive and even contribute to the knowledge about them. This project is the result of a collaboration via the Atlanta Studies Network, […]

Aims to both preserve this unintentional archive as it was before Manuel’s Tavern underwent renovations in 2015 and provide a platform through which one might learn more about the individual items in this archive and even contribute to the knowledge about them. This project is the result of a collaboration via the Atlanta Studies Network, Emory University’s Center for Digital Scholarship, Georgia State University’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and University Library, with additional contributions from the Savannah College of Art & Design in Atlanta and the Center for Public History at the University of West Georgia. While some archives are carefully curated by experts with clear intentions and institutional resources supporting their creation, other archives are unintentional and organic collections of materials that have gathered in a corner of a city like driftwood on the beach.  One such example of the later type of archive are the walls of Manuel’s Tavern, which over the past half century have slowly evolved into a record of the local established political left that inhabited that space; where a generation of cops, soldiers, and politicians—who believed in a more representative democracy—gathered to eat pork chops in a neighborhood occupied by immigrants, hippies, and punks. And to this day neighbors still treat it like an extra living room, where they come to watch elections or play chess. The project has received both local coverage (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, WABE, Creative Loafing, ArtsATL) as well as national coverage (New York Times). Note: All photographs, videos, and other materials hosted on this site are licensed CC BY NC.

Creator
Collaboration via the Atlanta Studies Network, including students, faculty, and staff from Georgia State University’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and University Library and Emory University's Center for Digital Scholarship, with additional contributions from the Savannah College of Art & Design in Atlanta, Center for Public History at the University of West Georgia, and others listed at http://unpackingmanuels.com/credits
Category
Arts & Culture

Beltline: A History of the Atlanta Beltline and its Associated Historic Resources

Prepared by the Spring 2006 Preservation Planning students. This project, developed in a collaborative effort by the Atlanta Urban Design commission and GSU students, was designed to highlight the history of the proposed redevelopment nodes along the Beltline, which is an outer band railroad line encircling the city. The purpose was to identify the significance […]

Prepared by the Spring 2006 Preservation Planning students. This project, developed in a collaborative effort by the Atlanta Urban Design commission and GSU students, was designed to highlight the history of the proposed redevelopment nodes along the Beltline, which is an outer band railroad line encircling the city. The purpose was to identify the significance of the resources therein and their links to Atlanta’s history, providing assistance in the overall development process of the Beltline project.

Creator
Heritage Preservation Students at Georgia State University Kadambari Badami, Janet Barrickman, Adam Cheren, Allison Combee, Savannah Ferguson, Thomas Frank, Andy Garner, Mary Anne Hawthorne, Hadley Howell, Carrie Hutcherson, Rebekah McElreath, Cherith Marshall, Rebekah Martin, Brandy Morrison, Bethany Serafine, and Tiffany Tolbert
Format

Atlanta Geology Walking Tour

Granite, limestone, and marble building stones are found in a 20-block area that is centered around the beginning of Peachtree Street. These three commercial types encompass a much greater range of rocks. Granite, limestone, marble, travertine, dolomite, serpentine, larvakite, gabbro, and gneiss are among the rock types found within the 50 varieties of commercial building […]

Granite, limestone, and marble building stones are found in a 20-block area that is centered around the beginning of Peachtree Street. These three commercial types encompass a much greater range of rocks. Granite, limestone, marble, travertine, dolomite, serpentine, larvakite, gabbro, and gneiss are among the rock types found within the 50 varieties of commercial building stones used in the area. A map has been prepared of the area and specific sites of geological interest have been identified. The building name is given in the descriptions of the buildings and rocks found in the area so that they may be located easily. Only the three commercial rocks names will be used in the tour so that one can look at the rock samples and try to determine their true nature. The tour originates at Georgia State University, 33 Gilmer Street, Atlanta, GA. Walking tour created by Dr. Bob Power, former GSU professor in Geosciences. Revised by Dr. Hassan Ali Babaie, GSU Associate Professor of Geosciences.

Creator
Faculty Advisor Brennan Collins, Ph.D., for the Student Innovation Fellowship program at Georgia State University, with Project Manager Ashley Cheyemi McNeil

Underground Atlanta Historic District Nomination

National Register of Historic Places Inventory nomination form submitted in 1980. Originally, the two-and-a-half-block area of the Underground district was a part of the larger gateway to the city. The history of this gateway to Atlanta mirrors the dynamic growth of the city as it expanded from a railroad and pedestrian town of the mid-nineteenth […]

National Register of Historic Places Inventory nomination form submitted in 1980. Originally, the two-and-a-half-block area of the Underground district was a part of the larger gateway to the city. The history of this gateway to Atlanta mirrors the dynamic growth of the city as it expanded from a railroad and pedestrian town of the mid-nineteenth century into a regional automobile and air metropolis of the late-twentieth century. The Underground Atlanta Historic District consists of several components: an approximately two-block area of buildings bounded by Alabama Street, Central Avenue, Peachtree Street, and the rear lot lines of properties along the north side of Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive; viaducts on Central, Pryor, Alabama and Wall streets; store fronts along the north side of Alabama Street below the viaduct; the Georgia Railroad Freight Depot at the east end of Alabama Street; and the Zero Mile Post under the Central Avenue viaduct.

Creator
Timothy Crimmins, Professor of History, GSU, and Richard Cloues, Architectural Historian

Single-Family Residential Development in DeKalb County, 1945-1970

Focused on suburban residential developments in DeKalb County, Georgia between the end of World War II and 1970 in order to better understand the transformation of the area after the Second World War. The resource includes data on national residential trends, architectural and landscape designs, as well as information on metropolitan Atlanta. The resource was […]

Focused on suburban residential developments in DeKalb County, Georgia between the end of World War II and 1970 in order to better understand the transformation of the area after the Second World War. The resource includes data on national residential trends, architectural and landscape designs, as well as information on metropolitan Atlanta. The resource was created to support the effort to preserve local neighborhoods, buildings, and landmarks by providing the historic context in which they were created.

Date created

Spring 2010

Creator
GSU History 8700 Case Studies in Historic Preservation students Kimberly Burton, Susan Conger, Rebeccah Crawford, Elisa Graf, Paul Graham, Debye Harvey, Nathan Jordan, Courtney Lankford, Molly Letterman, Elizabeth Morris, Chris Mroczka, Maysyly Naolu, Zach Ray, Louis Rodriguez, Anthony Souther, David Westbrook, and Caitlin Zygmon; Faculty Advisor Richard Laub
Format

Heritage Preservation Projects, 1991-Present

The Digital Archive of the Heritage Preservation Program (HPP) available in ScholarWorks @ Georgia State University is a compendium of student projects produced under the supervision of the HPP faculty from 1991 until the present. The Archive contains a variety of completed projects that document buildings and historic areas in and around Metropolitan Atlanta. The […]

The Digital Archive of the Heritage Preservation Program (HPP) available in ScholarWorks @ Georgia State University is a compendium of student projects produced under the supervision of the HPP faculty from 1991 until the present. The Archive contains a variety of completed projects that document buildings and historic areas in and around Metropolitan Atlanta. The projects include Historic Structure Reports of historic or endangered buildings, Historic District Information Forms prepared for submission to the Georgia Historic Preservation Division for eventual National Register Designation, Design Guideline and Planning projects that are intended to assist communities and neighborhoods in making design decisions about Locally Designated Historic Districts and Historic Context studies that focus on a particular building type, period of development (developmental history) or particular community. These documents embody a wide variety of buildings, neighborhoods and communities across Metro Atlanta. They demonstrate the body of work accomplished by the students of the Heritage Preservation Program and are here to be utilized by anyone seeking to research historic places in and around Atlanta.

Creator
Project Advisor Richard Laub, Director, Heritage Preservation Program, Department of History, Georgia State University, and students

Kell Hall: Capturing the Legacy

Originally built in 1925 as one of the first parking garages in the city, the Ivy Street Garage was renovated and opened to students in 1946. In 1964, it was renamed Kell Hall to honor Wayne S. Kell, the original director of the school. Kell Hall was demolished and replaced with a campus greenway in […]

Originally built in 1925 as one of the first parking garages in the city, the Ivy Street Garage was renovated and opened to students in 1946. In 1964, it was renamed Kell Hall to honor Wayne S. Kell, the original director of the school. Kell Hall was demolished and replaced with a campus greenway in 2021. On this website, you can browse the collections of digital items gathered, read about Kell Hall’s history, take a virtual tour of the building and contribute your own stories to the project. 

Creator
Georgia State University Library and the Student Innovation Fellowship
Category
Arts & Culture

East Atlanta

Historic District Information Form authored and submitted by GSU Case Studies in Historic Preservation students, Spring 2017. Located partially in the City of Atlanta, DeKalb County and in unincorporated DeKalb County, East Atlanta is a good example of an evolving suburb. In the late 19th and early 20th century the area was an urban neighborhood […]

Historic District Information Form authored and submitted by GSU Case Studies in Historic Preservation students, Spring 2017. Located partially in the City of Atlanta, DeKalb County and in unincorporated DeKalb County, East Atlanta is a good example of an evolving suburb. In the late 19th and early 20th century the area was an urban neighborhood that relied on the streetcar system and by World War II had evolved into an automobile-reliant suburban. Development progressed from a densely gridded street pattern in the northern portion indicating a traditional urban neighborhood to a curvilinear street pattern in the southern section indicating an automobile-centric suburb. The area includes at least three commercial nodes, a variety of historic houses and community and commercial buildings, a cemetery, a park, a Civil War monument, and five state historic markers.

Creator
GSU students Josh Curtis, Dana DeLessio, Blake Fortune, Cari Foster, Jana Futch, Phillipe Gonzalez, Marni Gordon, Aretha Hills, Dennis Lovello, Amber Ray, Stacy Rieke, and Sean Yates
Format

Decatur, GA

Design guidelines prepared by graduate students in the Preservation Planning Class of Georgia State University’s Heritage Preservation Program under the direction of Richard Laub and Mary Ann Eaddy, Spring 2011. These guidelines explain and interpret general design criteria in the local preservation ordinance for Decatur, serves as a tool to guide preliminary design decisions, preserves […]

Design guidelines prepared by graduate students in the Preservation Planning Class of Georgia State University’s Heritage Preservation Program under the direction of Richard Laub and Mary Ann Eaddy, Spring 2011. These guidelines explain and interpret general design criteria in the local preservation ordinance for Decatur, serves as a tool to guide preliminary design decisions, preserves historic character of the area, protects and stabilizes property values, makes suggestions for design appropriateness and provides neighborhood continuity, stability and predictability in assessing future change. The purpose of this report is to provide recommendations that aid in the preservation of the unique architectural and historic character of the city. The recommendations incorporate and revise the Design Supplement to the Decatur Historic Preservation Resource Manual, developed in 1997, the McDonough-Adams-King the Guidelines for MAK district property owners, developed in 2008, and the Historic Resource Survey: Final Report, City of Decatur, Georgia, September 1, 2009, developed in 2009. Students consulted with the Historic Preservation Commission of Decatur to ensure that these revisions accurately reflect the intent of Decatur’s local historic designations and the design review process. We hope that consideration of these recommendations will aid in the preservation of the unique architectural and historic character of the city. The Historic Preservation Planning Class would like to extend its appreciation to Regina Brewer and the entire Decatur Historic Preservation Commission for their support. We would also like to grate fully acknowledge the express help of Laura Drummond, Ken Kocher, Andrew Kohr, and the staff of the DeKalb History Center and Decatur Branch of DeKalb Public Library.

Creator
GSU graduate students Mollie Bogle, Jonathan Brown, Renee Brown-Bryant, Courtney Collins, Megan Covey, Elizabeth Decker, Wright Dempsey, Jennifer Dixon, Julie Federer, Audra George, Edward Howard, Katie Kennedy, Sarah Kurtz, Chrystal Perez, and Emily Taff; Faculty advisors: Richard Laub and Mary Ann Eaddy

Old Decatur

Prepared by the Spring 2006 Preservation Planning Class. These Design Guidelines explain and interpret general design criteria in the local preservation ordinance in Old Decatur, serves as a tool to guide preliminary design decisions, preserves historic character of the area, protects and stabilizes property values, makes suggestions for design appropriateness and provides neighborhood continuity, stability […]

Prepared by the Spring 2006 Preservation Planning Class. These Design Guidelines explain and interpret general design criteria in the local preservation ordinance in Old Decatur, serves as a tool to guide preliminary design decisions, preserves historic character of the area, protects and stabilizes property values, makes suggestions for design appropriateness and provides neighborhood continuity, stability and predictability in assessing future change. The purpose of this report is to provide recommendations that aid in the preservation of the unique architectural and historic character of the city.

Creator
GSU Students Nicholas Cavaliere, Laura Corazzol, Gitisha Goel, Carrie Hutcherson, Rebekah McElreath, Bethany Serafine, Don Spencer, Patrick Sullivan, and Matt Tankersley; Faculty advisors: Richard Laub and Mary Ann Eaddy