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Recent Atlanta Research from GSU in ScholarWorks

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digATLThe Digital Atlanta Portal

Projects, collections, and data about the metro area produced by Georgia State University faculty, staff, and students working with and within their communities. More ...

Arts & Culture

Digital tour of the rise and fall of the bawdy brothels that lined Downtown Atlanta’s Collins Street from the late 1800s to the early 1900s—showcasing tantalizing tidbits from newspapers, census records, city directories, property records, maps, and more from Georgia State University Library’s digital resources. Walk the streets (well, not like that!) and transport your imagination back to those bygone days when sin and Southern hospitality went hand in hand. Launched Spring 2022.

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Creator
Mandy Swygart-Hobaugh, Ph.D., Department Head, Research Data Services, Georgia State University Library
Category
Arts & Culture

Celebrating 50 years of hip-hop! The Rap Map visualizes metro Atlanta’s influence on hip-hop and hip-hop’s influence on the region over the last three decades. The Rap Map highlights the disconnect between the rapid pace of development in the city and its negligible impact on how hip hop music engages with the city’s geography. It is as if Atlanta’s economic renaissance skipped whole portions of the city and that is where hip hop in Atlanta was born. Project goals are to show the significance of music as a source for an aural history of cities and towns as well as to explore the symbiotic relationship between art and space.

The Rap Map is available through ATLMaps, https://atlmaps.org

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Creator
Faculty advisor Brennan Collins, Ph.D., Associate Director of the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Georgia State University for Digital Pedagogy and Atlanta Studies
Category
Arts & Culture

During the 1970s, Georgia State University archaeologists conducted systematic excavations associated with the construction of the Metro Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) rail lines. This project recovered the material remains of Atlanta’s past, and these materials represent the single most comprehensive archaeological collection of Atlanta’s history. In addition, the excavations themselves are among the pioneering projects of urban archaeology in the then nascent field of CRM (Cultural Resource Management). Thus, just the excavation archive, which is part of the collection, is invaluable for the history of archaeology in the US, especially the burgeoning new field of urban archaeology. The entire collection (440 medium-sized “banker” boxes housing over 100,000 artifacts and all the accompanying documentation and excavation archive) has recently been returned to GSU. Showcasing significant “moments” in the life of the city, including several Civil War sites associated with the Battle of Atlanta, the majority of the collection corresponds to the late 19th and early 20th century, the time of Atlanta’s rebirth as a major metropolitan area, the collection opens immense opportunities for faculty and student research and public education and outreach. Furthermore, it will facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations within GSU, as well as with other universities in the Atlanta-area for the curation, conservation, study, and exhibition of the artifacts and archive.

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Creator
Jeffrey Glover, Ph.D., GSU Department of Anthropology, and archaeology students
Category
Arts & Culture

Streetscape Palimpsest: A History of Georgia Avenue

Digital project that investigates the history of Georgia Avenue, which once served as an important commercial thoroughfare in the neighborhoods south of downtown Atlanta, and...
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Digital project that investigates the history of Georgia Avenue, which once served as an important commercial thoroughfare in the neighborhoods south of downtown Atlanta, and is now the southern edge of GSU’s campus. This interactive historical narrative rediscovers a neighborhood that was entirely replaced by urban renewal projects, and explains why Summerhill, and other “stadium neighborhoods” in Atlanta, were so thoroughly transformed over the course of the twentieth century. 

Creator
Marni Davis, Ph.D., History Department, Georgia State University
Category
Arts & Culture

Atlanta Sit-Ins, 1961-1964

Beginning in 1960, the Atlanta sit-in movement took over the downtown area of the city. Follow this tour to see where student activists conducted their...
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Beginning in 1960, the Atlanta sit-in movement took over the downtown area of the city. Follow this tour to see where student activists conducted their peaceful protests and sat down to stand up for what they believed in. You’ll learn about major players and events of the movement while visiting the actual sites where they happened. Historic photos and descriptions will help you see what the protestors saw and take you back to this time of energy and passion in Atlanta’s past. Created Spring 2019.

Creator
Faculty Advisor Marni Davis, Ph.D., for the Metropolitan Atlanta History course at Georgia State University; Contributing Authors Ryan Heazel, Curt Jackson, Joy Anna Dillard Appel, Ruth Elisabeth Stewart, Allison Wright, and Reshae D. Cooper: Continuity Editor: Allison Wright; Project Management/GIS Support: Curt Jackson.
Category
Arts & Culture

Atlanta-Fulton Public Library Collection: Maps

This digital collection contains digitized versions of items that are owned by the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library. Currently, the collection contains historical maps, dating from the...
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This digital collection contains digitized versions of items that are owned by the Atlanta-Fulton Public Library. Currently, the collection contains historical maps, dating from the 1850s to the 1980s, of Atlanta and the surrounding area. The maps were created by a variety of entities and for various purposes. More content is expected to be added to this collection in the future.

Creator
Georgia State University Library, Special Collections & Archives
Category
Arts & Culture

Atlanta Water Walk

How water has shaped the city. Video tour with urban designer and author Hannah Palmer. Palmer’s writing explores the intersection of Southern stories and urban...
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How water has shaped the city. Video tour with urban designer and author Hannah Palmer. Palmer’s writing explores the intersection of Southern stories and urban landscapes, and has appeared on CNN.com, Art Papers, Creative Loafing, and in masterplans for urban design projects around the world.

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ATLMaps

The ATLMaps platform, a collaboration between Georgia State University and Emory University, combines archival maps, geospatial data visualization, and user contributed multimedia location pinpoints to...
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The ATLMaps platform, a collaboration between Georgia State University and Emory University, combines archival maps, geospatial data visualization, and user contributed multimedia location pinpoints to promote investigation into any number of issues about Atlanta. While currently focused on one city to demonstrate the power of stacking thousands of layers of information on one place, this innovative online platform allows users to layer an increasing number of interdisciplinary data to address the complex issues that any city poses. The project looks to offer a framework that incorporates storytelling reliant on geospatial data and for normalizing input across a range of data sets about so that material can be cross-compared in novel ways, allowing users to make connections between seemingly unrelated data sources and ask questions that would not be apparent when only looking at one particular project. The ATLMaps project will also encourage knowledgeable members of the university and local communities to curate data on the site to demonstrate the possibilities for synthesizing material across projects and data types.

Complete list of ATLMaps contributors and past and present team members at https://atlmaps.org/about

Creator
Brennan Collins, Assoc. Director, GSU Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning for Digital Pedagogy and Atlanta Studies; Megan Slemons, GIS Librarian, Emory Center for Digital Scholarship; Jay Varner, Lead Software Engineer, Emory Center for Digital Scholarship; Tim Hawthorne, Assist. Professor of Geographic Information Systems, Dept. of Sociology, University of Central Florida; Joe Hurley: Ph.D. candidate, School of History and Sociology, Georgia Tech; Ben Miller, Senior Lecturer, Technical Writing & Digital Humanities, Emory University

Krog Codex: Archive of Krog Street Tunnel

A Community Interactive Digital Archive. Krog Street Tunnel is one of Atlanta’s premier destinations for street art, political communication, and a community bulletin board. Since...
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A Community Interactive Digital Archive. Krog Street Tunnel is one of Atlanta’s premier destinations for street art, political communication, and a community bulletin board. Since the late 1960s, artists have added and subtracted new paintings, messages, and designs to its walls, effectively creating a rapidly changing archive of local cultural concerns. The tunnel and the walls connected to it on DeKalb Avenue and Wylie Street comprise a single living dynamic work of art that is a cultural center of Cabbagetown. As such, to understand the cultural composition of the town, it is important to not only examine the art but also the creatives who give the tunnel life. Given the ephemeral nature of the tunnel art and its historical significance to the city, Georgia State University’s EPIC program, an academic research initiative dedicated to providing students with the opportunities to work on public-facing projects, has assembled a team of professors, graduate students, and undergraduates to document and catalog Krog Street tunnel’s art. In addition to regularly scanning and archiving the community’s tunnel art and murals, we also plan to conduct interviews with artists, patrons, and members of the community. This collection will become the basis of a frequently updated online publicly accessible 3d digital archive. Launched in 2022.

Creator
Georgia State University EPIC program students and faculty
Category
Arts & Culture

Unpacking Manuel’s Tavern

Aims to both preserve this unintentional archive as it was before Manuel’s Tavern underwent renovations in 2015 and provide a platform through which one might...
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Aims to both preserve this unintentional archive as it was before Manuel’s Tavern underwent renovations in 2015 and provide a platform through which one might learn more about the individual items in this archive and even contribute to the knowledge about them. This project is the result of a collaboration via the Atlanta Studies Network, Emory University’s Center for Digital Scholarship, Georgia State University’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and University Library, with additional contributions from the Savannah College of Art & Design in Atlanta and the Center for Public History at the University of West Georgia. While some archives are carefully curated by experts with clear intentions and institutional resources supporting their creation, other archives are unintentional and organic collections of materials that have gathered in a corner of a city like driftwood on the beach.  One such example of the later type of archive are the walls of Manuel’s Tavern, which over the past half century have slowly evolved into a record of the local established political left that inhabited that space; where a generation of cops, soldiers, and politicians—who believed in a more representative democracy—gathered to eat pork chops in a neighborhood occupied by immigrants, hippies, and punks. And to this day neighbors still treat it like an extra living room, where they come to watch elections or play chess. The project has received both local coverage (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, WABE, Creative Loafing, ArtsATL) as well as national coverage (New York Times). Note: All photographs, videos, and other materials hosted on this site are licensed CC BY NC.

Creator
Collaboration via the Atlanta Studies Network, including students, faculty, and staff from Georgia State University’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning and University Library and Emory University's Center for Digital Scholarship, with additional contributions from the Savannah College of Art & Design in Atlanta, Center for Public History at the University of West Georgia, and others listed at http://unpackingmanuels.com/credits
Category
Arts & Culture

A Race Against Time: Saving Atlanta’s Photographic History

Online exhibit feature photographs and negatives from Georgia State University’s Special Collections and Archives, consisting of images from six photographic collecting areas: Lane Brothers Commercial...
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Online exhibit feature photographs and negatives from Georgia State University’s Special Collections and Archives, consisting of images from six photographic collecting areas: Lane Brothers Commercial Photographers, Tracy W. O’Neal, Ernest G. Welch, Tom Coffin, David Lennox, and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archives. These visual treasures document daily life in Atlanta and the region during the twentieth century. This exhibit explores several different types of photography, from commercial to photojournalism, and the challenges of preserving a variety of photographic prints, negatives and born-digital materials of ever-changing technological formats. Over time, these unique images deteriorate, endangering our ability to provide access to the unique information about the many facets of public and private life as well as the built environment and natural world that only a photograph can provide. The physical exhibit was on display at Georgia State University’s Library Special Collections and Archives department from September 23, 2018–July 1, 2019.

Creator
This exhibit was created by Hilary Morrish, Archival Associate, and Michelle Asci, Photographic Technical Assistant, with the Special Collections and Archives department at the University Library, with the assistance of William Hardesty, Assistant Department Head, and Spencer Roberts, Digital Scholarship Librarian
Category
Arts & Culture

Downtown Folk Tour

Recorded stories from Dr. John Burrison, Folklorist and Professor of English at Georgia State University, who has collected stories of folk music, pottery, legends, medicine,...
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Recorded stories from Dr. John Burrison, Folklorist and Professor of English at Georgia State University, who has collected stories of folk music, pottery, legends, medicine, and religious practices in Atlanta. This walking tour will guide you through folk sites downtown, specifically around locations which now make up today’s GSU campus. This project was developed under the guidance of Dr. Brennan Collins for the Student Innovation Fellowship program at Georgia State University, Spring 2019.

Creator
Student Innovation Fellows Blaire Bosley and Chanan Myers, with John Burrison
Category
Arts & Culture