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digATLThe Digital Atlanta Portal

Projects, collections, and data about the metro area produced by Georgia State University faculty, staff, and students working with and within their communities. More ...

Environment & Health

Atlanta Water Walk

How water has shaped the city. Video tour with urban designer and author Hannah Palmer. Palmer’s writing explores the intersection of Southern stories and urban...
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How water has shaped the city. Video tour with urban designer and author Hannah Palmer. Palmer’s writing explores the intersection of Southern stories and urban landscapes, and has appeared on CNN.com, Art Papers, Creative Loafing, and in masterplans for urban design projects around the world.

Related Content

Atlanta Geology Walking Tour

Granite, limestone, and marble building stones are found in a 20-block area that is centered around the beginning of Peachtree Street. These three commercial types...
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Granite, limestone, and marble building stones are found in a 20-block area that is centered around the beginning of Peachtree Street. These three commercial types encompass a much greater range of rocks. Granite, limestone, marble, travertine, dolomite, serpentine, larvakite, gabbro, and gneiss are among the rock types found within the 50 varieties of commercial building stones used in the area. A map has been prepared of the area and specific sites of geological interest have been identified. The building name is given in the descriptions of the buildings and rocks found in the area so that they may be located easily. Only the three commercial rocks names will be used in the tour so that one can look at the rock samples and try to determine their true nature. The tour originates at Georgia State University, 33 Gilmer Street, Atlanta, GA. Walking tour created by Dr. Bob Power, former GSU professor in Geosciences. Revised by Dr. Hassan Ali Babaie, GSU Associate Professor of Geosciences.

Creator
Faculty Advisor Brennan Collins, Ph.D., for the Student Innovation Fellowship program at Georgia State University, with Project Manager Ashley Cheyemi McNeil

The Art of Nursing & Caring for the Sick and Afflicted: The Grady School of Nursing Legacy

In commemoration of the 120th anniversary of the founding of the Grady Memorial Hospital School of Nursing. The Grady Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, chartered...
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In commemoration of the 120th anniversary of the founding of the Grady Memorial Hospital School of Nursing. The Grady Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, chartered in 1898, was the first nursing school in Georgia and served as a cornerstone to the education and training of nurses in the region and across the United States. In 1917 the Municipal Training School for Colored Nurses at Grady was chartered, providing nursing education to black nursing students. These two programs were integrated in September 1964. During its tenure of 84 years, the School trained over 4,000 nurses as it grew and developed along with the field of nursing education.
Keywords: exhibits, collections, healthcare, higher education

Creator
Exhibit created by Kathleen LaPorte, graduate student in the School of Public Health, Georgia State University, and graduate assistant for the Southern Labor Archives, Special Collections and Archives, University Library. Thanks to Spencer Roberts, Digital Scholarship Librarian, for his guidance and assistance with the creation of the exhibit and Traci Drummond, archivist for the Southern Labor Archives

Atlanta’s Forest

Student project from GSU Department of Geosciences. With more than 80,000 acres of tree cover inside the Perimeter, Atlanta leads the nation in urban tree...
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Student project from GSU Department of Geosciences. With more than 80,000 acres of tree cover inside the Perimeter, Atlanta leads the nation in urban tree cover; approximately 47% of the city has significant tree growth. Atlanta’s forest is home to over 50 species of native trees, which work to reduce carbon dioxide, produce oxygen, conserve and filter water, serve as habitats for native and endemic species throughout the Piedmont region, cool neighborhoods, and serve as recreational areas. In a city where the tree canopy is already being lost, is submerged in its own wastewater, is experiencing extreme climate change, including enhanced heatwaves, and other factors documented here, the current threat of deforestation has placed the city’s trees in an historically critical situation. Launched 2022; last accessed 2022-10-15 

Creator
Undergraduate students Michael Bowers-Dean and Magnolia McLaughlin, with infographics by Zachary Draper